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Reports, presentations, articles and guides related to IAEH key areas of interest. Search by subject clicking on the categories box above.

Category: Increasing community and sport participation

eventIMPACTS – Social Impact Toolkit

The eventIMPACTS Toolkit is intended to provide organisers and supporters of public events with some key guidance and good practice principles for evaluating impacts associated with their event. The project is backed by the UK government. Click here to access the eventIMPACTS website.

The Social Impact Toolkit available here seeks to provide the starting point for a more structured approach to the measurement of the social impacts of events. The reason for measuring social impacts can often be linked directly to the aims and objectives of the event funders. Any event organiser should wish to understand how their event impacts on the perceptions and behaviour of people (whether directly or indirectly).

eventIMPACTS has identified four areas of social impacts:

– Participation

– Volunteering & Skills

– Identity and Image

– Satisfaction

The toolkit proposes a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to analyse the social impacts of hosting major events and provides evidence and indicators for each of the identified areas.

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The eSports Effect

This report is a compilation of the findings from an Eventbrite survey completed by more than 1500 attendees of live eSports tournaments and competitions from 2013-2014. There are interesting observations on trends and commercial opportunities and also insights into the profile of eSport event gamers. The results reveal that the eSports industry is growing fast and that fans are more and more interested in attending eSports events.

The demand for these events is greater than ever. Just as fans of traditional sports would not miss the big game, and music fans anticipate their favourite artist’s next tour, eSports fans go to live events to take part in a singular experience where they can see the best of the best in action. This passion and sense of exclusivity can translate into real revenue for developers, sponsors, convention directors and host cities.

The report suggests that gamers want more events, more often and in more places. It also concludes that live eSports event participants love to attend as many gaming events as possible and are willing to travel far and wide to attend those events. Cities can benefit from hosting eSports events in many ways, including attracting visiting tourists and engaging with young people.

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Glasgow 2014 – XX Commonwealth Games Report

From winning the bid to the official results, this report shows a holistic view of Glasgow’s experience as the XX Commonwealth Games host city.

IAEH highlights differential points that made of the 2014 Commonwealth Games an outstanding event.

  • Sport Programme: Incorporated more Women’s and Para-sport events than ever before.
  • Ticketing: First Commonwealth Games to offer half-price children’s concessions. 5,000 tickets were set aside for disadvantaged children from across Scotland.
  • Human rights: Glasgow 2014 published its own approach to human rights – the first sporting mega-event organisation to do so anywhere in the world.
  • Sustainability: The first Commonwealth Games to achieve ISO 20121 status.
  • Planning: The Games was delivered on time and within its £575.6 million budget.

The full report comprising details of the Games delivery and including marketing strategy, operational planning, commercial partnerships and more is available to download here.

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Paris as host city for the UEFA EURO 2016

Members Only

In June 2016 Paris and nine other cities in France successfully hosted the UEFA EURO Football Tournament and in November, the Deputy Mayor of Paris in charge of Tourism & Sports, Jean-François Martins, spoke at the Host City Conference in Glasgow about the plan developed to host the major event and the lessons learned in the process.

The Local Organising Committee had the vision of making the EURO 2016 more than just another event and to make it serve as a boost to the city’s public policies. It developed a plan which considered the needs of the city and how the event could be used to accelerate and facilitate the fulfillment of those needs. As a result, actions were taken to engage all districts of the city, not only central Paris, and all Parisians, not only football fans. The mindset was of permanent attention to all stakeholders, aiming to deliver the best experience to all of them.

Paris also overcame terrorist threats and delivered a safe and secure event without undermining people’s enthusiasm. Finding the balance between excitement and security was the biggest challenge faced in hosting the EURO 2016, according to Jean-François who stated: “There was no magic, it was necessary to invest a lot of money and to have great collaboration between the national government, local public authorities, intelligence agencies, and the private sector”.

The tournament was a success and its impacts very positive; three million people visited Paris during the event; the Fan Zone by the Eiffel Tower welcomed 1.2 million visitors; a 92% satisfaction rate amongst tournament attendees was achieved and there was an increase of 6% in the number of search requests for VisitParis on Google.

The full presentation was kindly shared by Deputy Mayor Jean-François Martins and is available to download here.

2015 Cricket World Cup

This report shows the economic impacts and benefits analysis of hosting the 2015 Cricket World Cup. It was prepared by PwC Australia at the request of Cricket World Cup 2015 Ltd, Cricket Australia and New Zealand Cricket. The event was jointly hosted by Australia and New Zealand during February and March 2015. It served as a major catalyst for collaboration between the neighbours and is considered a successfully delivered major event.

From the report, IAEH highlights two points of difference:

  • Hosting the ICC CWC 2015 in partnership required considerable communication and cooperation between the Australian Federal Government and the New Zealand Government. Each country established a centralised agency to help coordinate their support and services. The Major Sporting Events Taskforce in Australia and the World Cup’s Office in New Zealand brought together the key government departments and agencies including Immigration, Customs and Border Control, Security, Foreign Affairs and Trade, and Tourism.
  • Focus on engagement with multicultural communities. The ICC CWC 2015 successfully attracted the interest and participation of multicultural communities, celebrating diversity in harmony. There was also a large participation of overseas communities, as 145,000 international tourists attended the tournament out of 595,000.

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Legacy of the London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games

The UK Government and Mayor of London’s official report on the impacts of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, published on the 4th anniversary of the Games.

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FIFA WOMEN’S WORLD CUP CANADA 2015

Members Only

Presentation of Canada’s objectives and outcomes of hosting the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2015.

 

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